Effects of Anthropogenic Sensory Stimuli on Wildlife Behavior and Habitat Integrity

This work seeks to understand and demonstrate the effects of human activities on wildlife using a functional sensory ecology approach and, combined with NASA and...

Mule deer with city backdrop photoThis work seeks to understand and demonstrate the effects of human activities on wildlife using a functional sensory ecology approach and, combined with NASA and National Park Service (NPS) products (soundscape) and expertise, developing spatially-explicit indices of risk from anthropogenic nightlight and noise (ANLN) for mammals and birds of conservation significance across the contiguous US. Additionally, this project will include quantitative prediction of ANLN impacts on habitat quality and connectivity across space using extensive datasets on mammal and bird distributions and avian reproductive success to maximize utility for the NPS and inter-agency partners.

Artificial Night Light and Noise Project Group

July, 2017 Artificial Night Light and Noise Project Meeting

The geospatial framework we propose to generate here will provide the NPS with a data-driven approach to identify priority locations for mitigation and forecasts benefits. At a finer scale, we are currently working with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to co-develop datasets, tools, and models to help understand and mitigate the effects of artificial nightlight on terrestrial mammals in Boise, ID.

HES Researchers

Other Research Collaborators

Clinton D. Francis, California Polytechnic State University
David Stoner, Utah State University
Jesse Barber, Boise State University
Andrew Molthan, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
Kurt Fristrup, NPS Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division
Kate Markham